KSBNS 2024

in conjunction with the APSN

October 15(Tue)-18(Fri), 2024
HICO, Gyeongju, South Korea

Symposia

  • Symposium 1 Recent studies on the impact of the brain's environment on the onset of Alzheimer's disease
    • Recent studies on the impact of the brain's environment on the onset of Alzheimer's disease

      • Date October 15
      • Time 13:00-14:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Jinsoo Seo / Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Jinsoo Seo / Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology

    Our brain interacts with other tissues, which can regulate and alter the brain's functions. Recent studies reveal that changes in the environment around the brain (such as blood vessels and guts) are closely linked to the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. In this symposium, we aim to discuss the latest research findings from distinguished speakers and explore how these discoveries could lead to the development of effective treatments.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Joel Blanchard Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Modeling the interactions of diet and genetics with in vitro models of the human brain
    Inhee Mook-Jung Seoul National University Evidence of the brain-gut axis in vivo and in vitro of Alzheimer's disease models
    Soochul Park Sookmyung Women's University Cerebrovascular clearance of neurotoxic substances and Alzheimer's disease
  • Symposium 2 Brain-body communication: reciprocal mechanisms for homeostasis
    • Brain-body communication: reciprocal mechanisms for homeostasis

      • Date October 15
      • Time 13:00-14:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Jong-Woo Sohn / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Hyung Jin Choi / Seoul National University

    Brain and body communicate and work together to maintain homeostasis, which is the state of equilibrium or balance in the internal environment of our body. In particular, the hypothalamus and the brainstem are responsible for coordinating the activity of all the body’s systems, which includes endocrine organs, digestive tract, skeletal muscle and even microbiome to secure homeostasis. In this symposium, there will be cutting-edge researchers on bi-directional communication between brain and peripheral organs.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Ivan de Araujo Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybergenetics Parallel circuitries that connect body and brain
    Joe Eun Son Kyungpook National University IRX3 and IRX5: genetic regulators of hypothalamic neurogenesis in the control of obesity
    Kevin W. Williams University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Effects of metabolic state on the regulation of melanocortin neurons
    Min-Seon Kim University of Ulsan Regulation of skeletal muscle by hypothalamic neurons
  • Symposium 3 Beta and gamma bursts: the neural oscillatory underpinnings of higher-order cognitive processing
    • Beta and gamma bursts: the neural oscillatory underpinnings of higher-order cognitive processing

      • Date October 15
      • Time 13:00-14:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Jee Hyun Choi / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Hye-Young Shin / Seoul National University

      Moderator

      Jee Hyun Choi / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    This symposium is dedicated to improving our understanding of transient oscillations in the beta and gamma frequency bands, which are increasingly recognised as crucial for interpreting the neural mechanisms of cognition and behaviour. The aim is to further explore the underlying neural mechanisms associated with these cognitive processes and to identify new avenues of research. The agenda includes an examination of the role of beta bursts in predictive coding, the interplay between beta and gamma bursts in cognitive functioning, the neural circuitry underlying beta and gamma bursts, and the clinical implications that these bursts may have. It is expected that the symposium will act as a conduit for the exchange of the latest research on beta and gamma bursts and their role in higher-level cognitive processing, encompassing studies in mice, monkeys and humans.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Andre Bastos Vanderbilt University Layer and rhythm specificity for predictive routing
    Hyeyoung Shin Seoul National University Transient spectral events: mechanisms and meaning
    Hio-Been Han Massachusetts Institute of Technology Theta long-range synchrony in the cerebral cortex in support of perception and action
  • Symposium 4 Mechanisms of pain, itch, touch and interoception
    • Mechanisms of pain, itch, touch and interoception

      • Date October 15
      • Time 13:00-14:40
      • Location Hall 4
      Organizer

      Greg Seong-Bae Suh / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Greg Seong-Bae Suh / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

    Humans and many other organisms use their five senses to gather the physicial and chemical information from the external world. The noceiceptive system and its associated touch, itch and pain sensations rely not only on the external senses, but require interceptive sensing. This symposium will explore recent advances in our understanding of mammalian somatosensation that highlight the use of cutting-edge technologies and reveal novel mechanisms involved genes, neural circuits and behavior. We will also reserve time for a short talk that represents another type of interoceptive sensing in animal. Our goal is to encourage the sharing unpublished data, promote lively discussions and foster new collaborations across the field.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Zhou-Feng Chen Shenzhen Bay Laboratory The coding logic of itch, pain and touch
    Hyosang Lee Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology Twik1 in the somatosensory pathway mediates innocuous mechanosensation and mechanical allodynia
    Wenbiao Gan Peking University Clear optically matched panoramic access channel technique (COMPACT) for large-volume deep brain imaging to study nerve injury and inflammatio
  • Symposium 5 Advances in speech brain-computer interfaces: from mapping to synthesis
    • Advances in speech brain-computer interfaces: from mapping to synthesis

      • Date October 15
      • Time 13:00-14:40
      • Location Hall 5
      Organizer

      Chun Kee Chung / Seoul National University

      Moderator

      Chun Kee Chung / Seoul National University

    Communication, crucial for human interaction, encompasses two key aspects: perception and production. This symposium delves into the advanced Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology, focusing on neural mechanisms underlying these processes and state-of-the-art deep learning architectures. This symposium deals with crucial challenges such as intelligibility, controllability based on speech processing in human brain. We expect this symposium will provide insights into innovative frameworks and applications revolutionizing the field of speech BCI. Appealing to a diverse audience interested in the intersection of technology and science, this symposium bridges pioneering electrodes recording neural activities, brain stimulation to evoke perception, and BCIs to reconstruct one’s intention.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Sunggu Yang Incheon National University The subdural electrode based speech mapping in live non-human primates
    Sung-Phil Kim Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology Spatiotemporal electrocorticographic patterns during brain stimulation-induced auditory perception
    Chang-Hwan Im Hanyang University Deep learning methods for speech recognition from neural signals
    Hong-Goo Kang Yonsei University Neural speech synthesis from electrical bio-signals
  • Symposium 6 Neuroimmune regulation of brain physiology and pathology
    • Neuroimmune regulation of brain physiology and pathology

      • Date October 16
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Han Kyoung Choe / Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Han Kyoung Choe / Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology

    The neuroimmune interaction emerges as a key player in regulating the physiology and pathology of the brain as well as controlling immune functions. The crosstalk between the nervous system and the immune system embraces multiple types of organs, tissues, and cells, requiring comprehensive investigation at multiple levels. To facilitate understanding of current advances in neuroimmune interaction, we aim to collect leading scientists focusing on each critical player - traditional immune system, brain-blood barrier, glial cells, and even brain-resident immune cells. This session will provide a comprehensive introduction and discussion of the diverse types of neuroimmune interaction and their physiological and pathological consequences, with the hope of incubating international collaboration.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Yeong Shin Yim The University of Pennsylvania Brain-specific CD8+ T cells and brain homeostasis
    Eunha Kim Korea University Maternal gut bacteria drive intestinal inflammation in offspring with neurodevelopmental disorders by altering the chromatin landscape of CD4+ T cells
    Won-Suk Chung Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Stress induces behavioral abnormalities by increasing expression of phagocytic receptor MERTK in astrocytes to promote synapse phagocytosis
    Do-Geun Kim Korea Brain Research Institute Pathological roles of blood brain barrier dysfunction in the development of neurodegenerative diseases
  • Symposium 7 Navigating complexity: symposium on advancements in 3D neural organoid models for understanding brain disorders and neurodevelopment
    • Navigating complexity: symposium on advancements in 3D neural organoid models for understanding brain disorders and neurodevelopment

      • Date October 16
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Chul Hoon Kim / Yonsei University

      ChangHui Pak / University of Massachusetts Amherst

      Moderator

      Chul Hoon Kim / Yonsei University

    In the past decade, human pluripotent stem cell derived 3D neural organoids have become invaluable tools for modeling early developmental processes and central nervous system disorders. As neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders are shaped by underlying complex human genetic backgrounds which ultimately modify the disease risk, onset, and progression, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) grants direct access to unique human genetic backgrounds for experimental exploration. This symposium aims to showcase ongoing research by early-stage investigators who have utilized 3D neural organoid models to gain insights into the complexities of brain disorders and neurodevelopment. By focusing on the intersection of advanced cellular models and complex genetic influences, the speakers will present recent findings contributing to our understanding of translational research.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    ChangHui Pak University of Massachusetts Amherst Uncovering cell-type-specific vulnerabilities and synaptic connectivity deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders through forebrain organoid models
    Ki-Jun Yoon Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Investigating human brain development and disorders using stem cell-derived models
    Jinsoo Seo Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology Early cellular changes in neurons linked to presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease
  • Symposium 8 Neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory formation: insights from cross-species comparisons in hippocampal function
    • Neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory formation: insights from cross-species comparisons in hippocampal function

      • Date October 16
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Sang Ah Lee / Seoul National University

      Moderator

      Sang Ah Lee / Seoul National University

      Inah Lee / Seoul National University

    The critical role of the hippocampus in spatial and episodic memory has been documented across many species across the phylogenetic tree. While the field has benefited immensely from the wide range of studies on hippocampal function, it still remains a challenge to bring together unique insights from each species into a comprehensive understanding of how episodic memory works. In this symposium, expert neuroscientists in the field of memory research across rodents, non-human primates, and humans will share their recent findings on hippocampal processes measured at the level of single neurons, brain oscillations, and functional neuroimaging. In discussing both common and unique characteristics of spatial and episodic memory across multiple species, we hope to provide a fresh perspective on how such evolutionarily ancient neural mechanisms give rise to our daily experience of episodic memory. By bridging research across subfields of behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, this symposium will interest researchers from various areas of neuroscience and the broad KSBNS community.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Inah Lee Seoul National University Hippocampal neural correlates of spatio-contextual object memory in nonhuman primates
    Sebastien Royer Korea Institute of Science and Technology Neural network mechanisms underlying the formation of episodic memory
    Joshua Jacobs Columbia University Novel brain patterns underlying spatial and episodic memory in humans
    Sang Ah Lee Seoul National University Binding memories across space and time in episodic memory
  • Symposium 9 Shining light on astrocytes: role of reactive astrocytes in neurological disorders
    • Shining light on astrocytes: role of reactive astrocytes in neurological disorders

      • Date October 16
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 4
      Organizer

      Heejung Chun / Yonsei University

      Tae-In Kam / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Heejung Chun / Yonsei University

      Tae-In Kam / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

    Astrocytes play multiple and essential roles in brain function. In response to various pathological stimuli, reactive astrocytes exhibit molecular, structural and functional alterations and play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Reactive astrocytes lose their homeostatic function and have beneficial and/or detrimental effects on disease progression. Although in vivo research ranging from molecular and cellular levels to behavioral levels are challenging, research into the relevant mechanisms and diagnosis of neurological disorders through reactive astrocytes is actively ongoing. This symposium will in-depth discuss the role of reactive astrocytes and diagnostic/therapeutic strategies for treating neurological disorders and will shed light on the enigmatic roles and mechanisms of astrocytes in the brain.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Min-Ho Nam Korea Institute of Science and Technology Paradoxical tonic excitation mediated by astrocytic GABA causes neuropathic pain
    Tae-In Kam Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Role of neurotoxic reactive astrocytes in Lewy body dementia
    Heejung Chun Yonsei University Astrocytic MAO-B mediates neuronal tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer’s disease
    Nobuyuki Okamura Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University 18F-SMBT-1 PET imaging of reactive astrogliosis in neurodegenerative diseases
  • Symposium 10 Regulation of neuronal functions by RNA-binding proteins in health and diseases
    • Regulation of neuronal functions by RNA-binding proteins in health and diseases

      • Date October 16
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 5
      Organizer

      Kwok-On Lai / City University of Hong Kong

      Moderator

      Kwok-On Lai / City University of Hong Kong

    In this symposium, four international speakers will share their recent findings that provide new insights into RBP functions in neurons. Sourav Banerjee (National Brain Research Centre of India) will discuss a novel way to regulate local mRNA translation via FUS and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) at the synapse and its role in learning and memory. Che-Kun James Shen (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) will present a new role and mechanism of TDP-43 in pre-mRNA splicing in a transgenic mouse model of ALS. Nobuyuki Shiina (National Institutes of Natural Sciences) will describe an unconventional mechanism by which FUS and TDP-43 control local translation during synapse formation. Kwok-On Lai (City University of Hong Kong) will discuss a strategy that involves transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) to demonstrate how chronic behavioural stress interacts with ALS-related FUS gene mutation to aggravate the disease phenotypes of human neurons in vivo.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Sourav Banerjee National Brain Research Centre Synapse-enriched long non-coding RNAs regulates fear memory formation involving dendritic protein synthesis
    James C.-K. Shen Taipei Medical University RNA mis-metabolism and pathogenesis of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) carrying mutation in the RNA-binding and ALS-associated protein TDP-43
    Nobuyuki Shiina National Institutes of Natural Sciences Impact of pathogenic FUS and TDP-43 on RNG105/caprin1 dynamics in RNA granules: Implications for synaptic loss in neurons
    Kwok-On Lai City University of Hong Kong Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related mutation on the RNA-binding protein FUS disrupts synapses of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cortical neurons
  • Symposium 11 Mechanobiology in the nervous system
    • Mechanobiology in the nervous system

      • Date October 16
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Soo-Jin Oh / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Uhtaek Oh / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Soo-Jin Oh / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Uhtaek Oh / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    Mechanobiology in the nervous system explores how mechanical forces influence the structure, function, and development of neural tissues. This symposium delves into the intricate relationship between mechanical cues/stimuli and neuronal/glial processes, from molecular and cellular responses to tissue-level organization. Experts will discuss topics such as mechanotransduction primarily mediated by mechanosensitive ion channels in brain cells and the impact of biomechanical forces on signal transduction and cellular homeostasis. Cutting-edge research will unravel the fascinating interplay between mechanics and neurobiology and broaden our understanding of the complexity and resilience of the nervous system.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Uhtaek Oh Korea Institute of Science and Technology Tentonins, mechanosensitive channels and their functions
    Bailong Xiao Tsinghua University Forcing PIEZO channels to open
    Soo-Jin Oh Korea Institute of Science and Technology Tweety-homolog (TTYH) family encodes volume regulating anion channel
    Bo-Eun Yoon Dankook University Carbon nanotube platform regulating intracellular calcium and physiological functions of astrocytes differentially across brain regions
  • Symposium 12 Adversity on the growing brain: from mouse to man
    • Adversity on the growing brain: from mouse to man

      • Date October 16
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      June-Seek Choi / Korea University

      Moderator

      June-Seek Choi / Korea University

    Despite the paramount importance of adverse experience during early development on cognition and emotion in later stages of life, only a small number of studies have addressed this issue. In this symposium, four distinguished researchers from Hong Kong, Australia, and Korea will introduce the latest findings from their laboratories using rodents and human subjects. The audience in this symposium session is guaranteed to gain valuable insights into how stress and trauma during different stages of development modulate neurobehavioral systems in adolescence and adulthood.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Ying-Shing Chan The University of Hong Kong Developmental impact on spatial cognition in the adult
    Jee Hyun Kim Deakin University Stress prolonged adolescence hypothesis: conditioned fear extinction and hippocampal neurogenesis evidence that early life stress potentiates and delays maturation
    June-Seek Choi Korea University Differential brain responses to chasing stress in the adolescent and adult brain
    Ji-Won Hur Korea University Neural correlates of vulnerability to nonsuicidal self-injury in response to childhood adversity
  • Symposium 13 Transcriptomic and epitranscriptomic regulation of brain function and experience-dependent plasticity
    • Transcriptomic and epitranscriptomic regulation of brain function and experience-dependent plasticity

      • Date October 16
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Anthony Hannan / University of Melbourne

      Moderator

      Anthony Hannan / University of Melbourne

    In this symposium, we bring together international speakers who are investigating novel aspects of RNA biology, in the context of neurodevelopment, experience-dependent plasticity, and other aspects of brain function, and dysfunction. The topics within transcriptomics and epitranscriptomics covered will include circular RNAs, small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and RNA modifications. This symposium will share novel insights regarding the various ways in which RNA biology can mediate, and modulate, a wide range of processes within the developing and mature nervous system. Symposium attendees will be encouraged to consider RNA not only as medium for information transfer between DNA and protein levels, but also the wider realm of functional RNAs, and their key roles in brain development, function, and dysfunction.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Timothy Bredy University of Queensland Circular RNA-derived micropeptides at the synapse: a new mechanism of localized plasticity and memory?
    Dan Ohtan Wang New York University Abu Dhabi Forebrain neuronal deletion of m6A reader YTHDF3 modulates mouse adaptive behaviors in response to enriched environment
    Anthony Hannan University of Melbourne Noncoding RNAs regulating brain function within and between generations
  • Symposium 14 The complex function of the lateral habenula complex
    • The complex function of the lateral habenula complex

      • Date October 16
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 4
      Organizer

      Jung-Soo Han / Konkuk University

      ChiHye Chung / Konkuk University

      Moderator

      Jung-Soo Han / Konkuk University

    Over the past ten years, there has been a significant surge in interest in the lateral habenula (LHb) due to recent discoveries highlighting its crucial role in controlling negatively driven behavior and its involvement in reward prediction as well as stress response. The LHb receives inputs from diverse limbic forebrain/basal ganglia structures, and targets essentially all midbrain neuromodulatory systems, including all the monoamine systems: so is anatomically well-positioned to integrate valence-based information to regulate various motivational and cognitive processes. We will discuss how emotional contagion promotes coping behaviors in conditions of heightened stress, and how this part of the emotional brain can determine social behaviors. We will expand the discussion to the role of the lateral habenula during the rewarding and aversive conditions in virtual reality as well as during conditioned inhibition, a fundamental component of associative learning. This symposium will shed light on the recent studies regarding the more complex function of the LHb.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Manuel Mameli The University of Lausanne Emotional contagion, serotonin and habenula in the regulation of resilience
    ChiHye Chung Konkuk University Sociality regulation under the stress by cortico-habenula pathway
    HyungGoo Kim Sungkyunkwan University Characterization of LHb neuronal activity while mice receive rewarding and aversive stimuli in virtual reality
    Jung-soo Han Konkuk University The role of the lateral Habenula in conditioned inhibition
  • Symposium 15 Neurobiology of drug addiction
    • Neurobiology of drug addiction

      • Date October 16
      • Time 17:00-18:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Joung Hun Kim / Pohang University of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Joung Hun Kim / Pohang University of Science and Technology

    Repeated exposure to a drug of abuse induces neuronal and synaptic changes in the brain, leading to the compulsive seeking and use of drugs, and the loss of control over drug consumption. This addiction imposes a significant social and economic burden on the community. However, the processes through which addiction memory is established, perpetuated, and amplified remain unclear. Research on addiction memory utilizes various tools and concepts to elucidate the causal components of addictive states, understand the neural mechanisms involved, and develop effective therapeutic interventions. At this symposium, prominent researchers actively investigating addiction memory will present new findings that contribute to a deeper understanding of how molecular, cellular, and circuit changes in the nervous system dictate addiction memory and compulsive behavior.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Xiaoke Chen Stanford University Neuronal representation of drug craving in mouse
    Anne Elizabeth West Duke University TBA
    Ja Wook Koo Korea Brain Research Institute TBA
    Tae-Kyung Kim Pohang University of Science and Technology TBA
  • Symposium 16 Neuronal dynamics in the prefrontal cortex: insights into plasticity, physiology, and pathology
    • Neuronal dynamics in the prefrontal cortex: insights into plasticity, physiology, and pathology

      • Date October 16
      • Time 17:00-18:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Won Chan Oh / University of Colorado

      Moderator

      Won Chan Oh / University of Colorado

    Proper synaptic plasticity is essential for neural circuit function, and conversely, altered synaptic dynamics impair neuronal activity and are thought to underlie the pathology of brain disorders including ASDs. This idea is supported by the observation of increased synapse number in the frontal lobe in ASD brains. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a brain region associated with higher cognition that is shown to be disrupted in ASDs; yet, key questions remain unanswered concerning the neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the detrimental effects of altered synaptic and neuronal activity on PFC function. This symposium will bring together rising neuroscientists, leading experts in the synaptic and cellular basis of neuronal plasticity, to discuss the most recent advances in the field. A diverse group of 4 speakers will present recent findings on PFC function and dysfunction that are relevant to the major theme of this symposium.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Akiko Hayashi-Takagi RIKEN Linking neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex to ASD symptoms: a reverse-translational assessment in ASD model mice
    Sho Yagishita The University of Tokyo Microglia-mediated noradrenergic gating of spine enlargement in the medial prefrontal cortex
    Jung Ho Hyun Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology Cellular learning rules for structural knowledge-based decision flexibility
    Won Chan Oh University of Colorado Synapse-level mechanisms of serotonin actions on neuronal plasticity in the prefrontal cortex
  • Symposium 17 A journey towards neurodegenerative disorder cures: navigating scientific frontiers in conjunction with Women's Bioscience Forum
    • A journey towards neurodegenerative disorder cures: navigating scientific frontiers in conjunction with Women's Bioscience Forum

      • Date October 16
      • Time 17:00-18:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Eun Jeong Lee / Ajou University

      Moderator

      Eun Jeong Lee / Ajou University

      Mikyoung Park / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    With the aging society, there is an increasing societal demand for research in the field of neuroscience, particularly in degenerative brain diseases. We would like to introduce female scientists actively contributing to various research methods in the diverse field of neurodegenerative diseases to KSBNS participants. Through this, we hope to encourage the influx of more women scientists into the field of neuroscience, introduce new perspectives in neurodegenerative disease research, and foster numerous collaborations.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Jee-Yin Ahn Sungkyunkwan University Functional loss of EBP1 in Alzheimer neurodegeneration and potent mouse model for sporadic AD
    Eun Jeong Lee Ajou University Body-brain interaction in developing Parkinson's disease
    Hyejin Park Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Deciphering the interplay of PARP-1 and MIF nuclease activity in α-synuclein-driven neurodegeneration
    Ji-Yeun Hur Ajou University The modulation of γ-secretase in Alzheimer’s disease
  • Symposium 18 From natural intelligence to brain disease models in non-human primates
    • From natural intelligence to brain disease models in non-human primates

      • Date October 17
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Joonyeol Lee / Sungkyunkwan University

      Hyoung F. Kim / Seoul National University

      Moderator

      Joonyeol Lee / Sungkyunkwan University

    This interdisciplinary symposium brings together experts in primate systems neuroscience and medical research. It explores primate intelligence's complexity and its implications for understanding the human brain, particularly in the context of brain diseases. Topics include natural intelligence in social settings, neural circuit mechanisms for efficient decision-making, and cutting-edge genetic techniques for modeling mental diseases in non-human primates. The symposium welcomes researchers, clinicians, students, and anyone interested in primate research, systems neuroscience, and brain disease studies. It offers a comprehensive overview of current research and fosters discussions on future directions in this field.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Kenichi Inoue Kyoto University Towards social behavior analysis in normal and disease model primates
    Hyoung F. Kim Seoul National University Your fingertip knows which is good: tactile and visual value abstraction in the primate putamen
    Soo Hyun Park Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Studying dynamic visual processing in non-human primate model
    Youngjeon Lee Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology Research on brain disease models using non-human primates
  • Symposium 19 Emerging insights in neuroimmunology and pain
    • Emerging insights in neuroimmunology and pain

      • Date October 17
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Chul-Kyu Park / Gachon University

      Sun Wook Hwang / Korea University

      Moderator

      Dong-Kuk Ahn / Kyungpook National University School of Dentistry

    The 'Emerging Insights in Neuroimmunology and Pain' symposium explores the nexus between the nervous system and immune responses in pain. Focusing on how interleukins, microglia, and macrophages affect neuropathic pain, it integrates cutting-edge research on molecular pathways with clinical implications. Highlights include gender-specific neuroimmunological responses and novel therapeutic strategies. This interdisciplinary event appeals to researchers and clinicians, fostering dialogues and inspiring new treatments.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Temugin Berta University of Cincinnati Medical Center Microglial STING activation alleviates nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in male but not female mice
    Gang Chen Nantong University Spinal interleukin-24 contributes to neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury through interleukin-20 receptor2 in mice
    Akio Wanaka Nara Medical University Dermal macrophages set pain sensitivity by modulating the amount of tissue NGF through an SNX25-Nrf2 pathway
    Yong Ho Kim Gachon University Amyloid beta 1-42 modulates heat pain sensitivity in mature adult mice: unveiling the LRP1-SHP2 pathway in TRPV1 inhibition
  • Symposium 20 Novel pathomechanisms and therapeutic targets in neurological disorders: latest in translational neurochemistry
    • Novel pathomechanisms and therapeutic targets in neurological disorders: latest in translational neurochemistry

      • Date October 17
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Jee Hyun Kim / Deakin University

      Moderator

      Jee Hyun Kim / Deakin University

      Kensuke Ikenaka / Osaka University

    In this symposium, professor Tohda will open the symposium with her latest findings using Alzheimer’s disorder model mice that showed how phytochemical diosgenin (a constituent of yam) can reverse axon damage, change gene expression, and improve memory. This allowed a clinical trial of yam extract, which confirmed its benefit on cognition in people with mild Alzheimer’s disorder. Associate Professor Cheung will then follow with research showing the novel link between vascular injury and neuroinflammation, showing a potential causal pathomechanism of cognitive dysfunction associated with brain hypoxia due to vascular injury. This research offers new therapeutic targets to treat neurovascular conditions such as vascular dementia. Dr Senesi will then propose how the misfolding of proteins such as prion in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a key mechanism that may apply across many neurological disorders including dementia. Such novel theory allows new therapeutic avenues to interfere with protein misfolding such as antibodies and antisense nucleotides to treat various neurological disorders. Lastly, Assistant Professor Ikenaka will present the novel discovery of lysosomal accumulation of KSBNS-APSN2024 SYMPOSIUM phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PIP3) as an upstream pathomechanism to α-synuclein accumulation in Parkinson's disease across many model organisms as well as patient brain samples. This finding offers new therapeutic targets for a pre-emptive treatment for Parkinson’s disease. Professor Jee Hyun Kim will chair with Assistant Professor Ikenaka (co-chair) to lead an impartial discussion of the presented findings and potential questions.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Chihiro Tohda University of Toyama Axonal repairing approach to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: from basic study to clinical study for realizing new botanical medicines
    Christine Cheung Nanyang Technological University Molecular basis of cerebral arteriovenous responses to brain hypoxia
    Matteo Senesi University of Melbourne Prions as prototypical agents for neurodegenerative diseases: mechanisms, therapeutics and beyond
    Kensuke Ikenaka Osaka University Exploring treatments for Parkinson's disease through understanding the mechanisms of alpha-synuclein aggregation and propagation
  • Symposium 21 Activity-dependent regulation in brain development: insights into normal development and epilepsy
    • Activity-dependent regulation in brain development: insights into normal development and epilepsy

      • Date October 17
      • Time 09:00-10:40
      • Location Hall 5
      Organizer

      Dan Ohtan Wang / New York University Abu Dhabi

      Moderator

      Dan Ohtan Wang / New York University Abu Dhabi

      Chunyue Geoffrey LAU / City University of Hong Kong

    Brain development is a highly regulated phenomenon in which a variety of processes are involved, including synaptic plasticity, synapse formation and elimination, excitation-inhibition balance, transcriptional control, and translational control. This symposium aims to capture some of the latest findings in neural development and its malfunction that is implicated in disease states like epilepsy. We have brought together four internationally recognized speakers with wide-ranging research interests and expertise. Dr. Dan Ohtan WANG (NYU Abu Dhabi) is an expert in epigenetic regulation of synapse formation and will be a Co-Chair. Dr. Geoffrey LAU (City University of Hong Kong) will be a Co-Chair and speaker. He will speak about how a limbic region, anterior piriform (olfactory) cortex is involved in temporal lobe epilepsy. Dr. Zhuo HUANG (Peking University) will speak about epilepsy and how environmental cues can trigger seizure bouts in a phenomenon called conditioned seizure memory. Dr. Jacque IP (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) will speak about visual cortical development and its relationship with an epilepsy-related neurodevelopmental disorder. Dr. Kyung-Min NOH (EMBL Heidelberg) will speak about epigenetic regulation induced by BDNF and its implications in epilepsy. Together, the topics and methodology brought forth will illustrate our current understanding and innovation in neural development and epilepsy, making this symposium a timely and engaging one.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Chunyue Geoffrey LAU City University of Hong Kong Suppression of piriform cortex alters brain-wide dynamics and alleviates seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy
    Jacque Pak Kan IP The Chinese University of Hong Kong Cortical visual impairment in CDKL5 deficiency disorder: unraveling insights into epilepsy-related neurodevelopmental disorders
    Zhuo HUANG Peking University Termination of convulsion seizures by destabilizing and perturbing seizure memory engrams
    Kyung-Min NOH European Molecular Biology Laboratory Heidelberg Comparative genomics upon neuronal stimulation delineates neuronal regulatory elements linked to neuropsychiatric traits including epilepsy
  • Symposium 22 Exploring neurodegenerative disorders: navigating the inner and outer realms of the brain
    • Exploring neurodegenerative disorders: navigating the inner and outer realms of the brain

      • Date October 17
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Eunha Kim / Korea University

      Moderator

      Eunha Kim / Korea University

    Neurodegenerative brain disorders present complex challenges that extend beyond the confines of the brain itself. Recent research suggests that the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders is not solely confined to localized brain dysfunction but involves a dynamic interplay with various extra-cranial factors. This symposium aims to illuminate the intricate web of connections between the brain and external organs, with a special emphasis on the gut, immune system, and microbiome. Understanding the mechanisms operating both within the brain and in collaboration with peripheral organs is crucial for advancing our comprehension of these debilitating conditions. By delving into the molecular and cellular mechanisms within the brain and exploring the interconnectedness with peripheral organs, we aim to unravel the complex tapestry of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Henning Ulrich University of San Paulo Purine and kinin receptors in neurogenesis and neurodegeneration
    Roberto de Pasquale University of San Paulo Crosstalk between caffeine consumption and neurodegenerative disorders
    Sangjune Kim Chungbuk National University Gut-to-brain propagation mouse model of Parkinson's disease
    Jung-Seok Kim Weizmann Institute of Science Colonization of non-cortical brain regions by monocyte-derived macrophages with a Dnmt3a mutation causes motor pathology
  • Symposium 23 Sensory processing: updates and storage of sensory information in prefrontal and parietal cortex
    • Sensory processing: updates and storage of sensory information in prefrontal and parietal cortex

      • Date October 17
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Jong-Cheol Rah / Korea Brain Research Institute

      Moderator

      Jong-Cheol Rah / Korea Brain Research Institute

    In the session ‘Sensory processing: Updates and storage of sensory information in prefrontal and parietal cortex’, we will explore the neural underpinnings of perception and short-term memory. In the session, we will explore the synergy of electrophysiology, calcium imaging and MRI in unraveling the mysteries of perception and short-term memory. This interdisciplinary approach will offer a comprehensive view of how senses are interpreted, stored, and manipulated. The session will foster collaboration among the scientists in the fields of cognitive, systems, and molecular neuroscience. Sensory information is processed in a dynamically regulated manner to successfully adapt to an ever-changing environment. During the session we will explore the dynamic network changes in response to rule-change, updated reward information, or simply during errors in short-term memory. We will explore the synergy of electrophysiology, calcium imaging and MRI in unraveling the mysteries of perception and short-term memory. This interdisciplinary approach will offer a comprehensive view of how senses are interpreted, stored, and manipulated. The session will foster collaboration among the scientists in the fields of cognitive, systems, and molecular neuroscience.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Daniel O'Connor Johns Hopkins University Rule-based modulation of a sensorimotor transformation
    Lukas Ian Schmitt RIKEN Thalamocortical networks dynamically encode statistical properties of sensory stimuli to enable perceptual inference
    Jong-Cheol Rah Korea Brain Research Institute Distributed encoding and opposite directional activities in the PPC during errors in short-term memory
    Won Mok Shim Sungkyunkwan University Spatially specific reward information in visual areas during closed-loop naturalistic interaction
  • Symposium 24 Synapse, circuits and systems: new approaches to understanding memory
    • Synapse, circuits and systems: new approaches to understanding memory

      • Date October 17
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Thomas McHugh / RIKEN

      Min-Ho Nam / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Thomas McHugh / RIKEN

      Min-Ho Nam / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    Our quest to understand memory builds on fundamental work addressing the molecular, synaptic, physiological and behavioral processes engaged during learning. Over the last decade rapid technological advancements on all these level, harnessing progress in machine learning, high-density imaging and recording, high-throughput genomics and proteomics and genetic tools for circuit characterization and manipulation, has accelerated progress in the field and uncovered new and surprising connections between levels of investigation. This session will showcase the application of these emerging approaches, including large-scale in vivo electrophysiology, whole-brain synaptome mapping, and virtual reality based brain-machine interfaces, to long-standing questions of how mammalian brains encode and use memories, as well as inspire researchers across all fields to harness these tools in their own work.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Thomas McHugh RIKEN Non-canonical hippocampal memory circuits
    Timothy Harris Johns Hopkins University Neuropixels 2.0: a miniaturized high-density probe for stable, long-term brain recordings
    Seth Grant The University of Edinburgh A brain atlas of synapse protein lifetime across the mouse lifespan
    Albert Lee Harvard University Volitional activation of remote place representations with a hippocampal brain–machine interface
  • Symposium 25 Integrative insights into neurobiology: from physiological neural models to neurodegenerative diseases and drug discovery
    • Integrative insights into neurobiology: from physiological neural models to neurodegenerative diseases and drug discovery

      • Date October 17
      • Time 14:00-15:40
      • Location Hall 4
      Organizer

      Sunmo Oh / Bio-Medical Science Co., Ltd.

      Hyungmin Im / CHAYON Laboratories, Inc.

      Moderator

      Jason Hamlin / STEMCELL Technologies, Inc.

    The suggested symposium theme, "Integrative Insights into Neurobiology: From Physiological Neural Models to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Drug Discovery," encompasses a comprehensive exploration of various facets of neuroscience research. The first topic emphasizes the use of physiological neural model systems to delve into studies related to brain development, neuronal maturation, and neuroinflammation. The second topic shifts the focus to utilizing microplate readers in unraveling neurodegenerative diseases, specifically highlighting prion research and protein aggregation. Finally, the third topic underscores the power of in vitro systems using human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models for advancing drug discovery. This amalgamation of diverse themes aims to encompass the broad spectrum of neuroscience while emphasizing practical and applicable research domains.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Jason Hamlin STEMCELL Technologies, Inc. Using physiological neural model systems to study neurodevelopment, neuronal maturation and neuroinflammation
    Joko Logis BMG LABTECH Uncovering neurodegenerative diseases using microplate readers: prion research and protein aggregation
    Ko Zushida FUJIFILM Cellular Dynamics, Inc. A powerful in vitro system using human iPSC models enables facilitating drug discovery
  • Symposium 26 Exploring the neural circuit representation of cognitive dynamics
    • Exploring the neural circuit representation of cognitive dynamics

      • Date October 18
      • Time 9:00-11:00
      • Location Hall 1
      Organizer

      Ain Chung / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Jaekyung Kim / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Min Whan Jung / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

    The symposium unveils novel perspectives on information storage and utilization, framing them as highly dynamic information processing phenomena. The plasticity of neural networks enables long-term stored information to enhance cognitive abilities, and the decision-making process intricately integrates current sensory input with stored value information. The symposium delves into the intricate information integration processes of cognition at the neural network level and aims to shed light on how these dynamic cognitive processes are represented and stored in the brain. Topics include the influence of neural activity during sleep on memory formation, the role of neuroplasticity in enhancing cognitive abilities, and the complex neural integration of olfactory and auditory input in decision-making. Through the symposium, attendees will gain insights into the cutting-edge research conducted by emerging neuroscientists who are actively investigating the neural correlates of cognition.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Jeongjin Kim Korea Institute of Science and Technology Dynamic neural representation for movement-dependent auditory decision making
    David M. Schneider New York University A cortical role for skilled, sound-guided behavior in mice
    Jaekyung Kim Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Exploring circuit dynamics during sleep and neural representations in motor learning
    Ain Chung Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Hippocampal circuit mechanisms underlying social information processing enhancement
  • Symposium 27 Neural circuit dysfunctions in autism spectrum disorders
    • Neural circuit dysfunctions in autism spectrum disorders

      • Date October 18
      • Time 9:00-11:00
      • Location Hall 2
      Organizer

      Seung-Hee Lee / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

      Co-organizer

      Institute for Basic Science (IBS)
      기초과학연구원 시냅스 뇌질환 연구단

      Moderator

      Seung-Hee Lee / Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by deficits in reciprocal social communication and the presence of restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior. It is highly heritable but regarded as a spectrum disorder, co-occurring with other diverse conditions. This symposium aims to present the most recent advancements in understanding neural circuit mechanisms governing pathological conditions in ASD. Esteemed neuroscientists will be featured in this symposium, encompassing both male and female speakers from the United States, Japan, and Korea. Each presenter in this symposium has employed state-of-the-art methodologies to delineate critical neural circuits underlying social deficits, sleep disturbances, memory deficits, and sensory dysfunctions in ASD mouse models. The symposium anticipates drawing a considerable audience interested in new aspects of brain dysfunctions in ASD.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Toru Takumi Kobe University Social neural networks in autism
    Shinjae Chung University of Pennsylvania Neural circuits underlying sleep disturbances and memory deficits in autism
    Franz Weber University of Pennsylvania Cortical regulation of REM sleep and its dysfunction in autism
    Yong-Seok Lee Seoul National University Sex-specific deficits in sensory processing in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome
  • Symposium 28 Neurobiological insights of neurodevelopmental disorders
    • Neurobiological insights of neurodevelopmental disorders

      • Date October 18
      • Time 09:00-11:00
      • Location Hall 3
      Organizer

      Scientific Program Committees of the KSBNS and AKN

      Moderator

      Seonil Kim / Colorado State University

      Sang Ki Park / Pohang University of Science and Technology

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are types of disorder that alters neurological development, causing difficulties in a wide range of brain functions. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders can experience difficulties with language and speech, motor skills, behavior, memory, learning, or other neurological functions. Causes are heterogeneous ranging from social deprivation, genetic and metabolic diseases, immune disorders, infectious diseases, nutritional factors, physical trauma, and toxic and environmental factors. However, our current knowledge of neurobiological mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders is far from complete. The current symposium aims to bring attention to research on neurobiological mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Jinju Han Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology AGO1-LIN28A-REELIN regulatory axis in brain development and disease: association of AGO1 with autism spectrum disorder
    Seonil Kim Colorado State University The autism-associated loss of δ-catenin functions disrupts social behavior
    Sang Ki Park Pohang University of Science and Technology Perturbed cell fate decision by schizophrenia-associated isoform of AS3MT during corticogenesis
    Hyun Kyoung Lee Baylor College of Medicine Deciphering mechanisms of perinatal white matter injury-induced neuropsychiatric outcome
  • Symposium 29 Plasticity beyond synapses: astrocyte morphoplasticity
    • Plasticity beyond synapses: astrocyte morphoplasticity

      • Date October 18
      • Time 9:00-11:00
      • Location Hall 4
      Organizer

      Wuhyun Koh / Institute for Basic Science

      C. Justin Lee / Institute for Basic Science

      Moderator

      Wuhyun Koh / Institute for Basic Science

    The concept of "brain plasticity" often conjures images of synaptic connections between neurons, both in the minds of neuroscientists and the general public. Our goal is to expand beyond this traditional viewpoint by proposing a symposium focused on the plasticity of astrocytes surrounding synapses. This session aims to highlight the significance of morphological plasticity—termed here as morphoplasticity—and explore its role in influencing cognitive functions within the brain.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Wuhyun Koh Institute for Basic Science Astrocytic ankyrin2 in hippocampal astrocyte morphogenesis and memory formation
    Ruotian Jiang Sichuan University Astrocyte morphological remodeling: at the synapse and beyond
    Baptiste Lacoste University of Ottawa Astroglial Hmgb1 regulates postnatal astrocyte morphogenesis and cerebrovascular maturation
    Sabina Berretta Harvard University Collaborations among peers: astrocyte-neuron interactions in plasticity and brain disorders
  • Symposium 30 Searching for the principles of neural networks: theoretical approaches
    • Searching for the principles of neural networks: theoretical approaches

      • Date October 18
      • Time 9:00-11:00
      • Location Hall 5
      Organizer

      Taegon Kim / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

      Moderator

      Taegon Kim / Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    Although modern neuroscience reveals the mechanism of specific brain functions and recent artificial neural network models demonstrate powerful performance on specific tasks, understanding how neural networks whether implemented naturally in the brain or artificially could generate such functions have been considered still enigmatic. Thus, this symposium session will focus on the effort to find out the general principles underlying how neural networks work in computational neuroscience. The topics in this symposium are selected and organized to promote in-depth discussions from a variety of perspectives, ranging from the conventional dynamics of neurons and synapses to the recently highlighted properties of neural networks, such as modulation or information processing cost.

    Time table
    Speaker Affiliation Title
    Mark van Rossum University of Nottingham Energy efficient learning in neuronal networks
    Louis Kang RIKEN Computational origins of seizure susceptibility in recurrent neural networks
    Hyojin Bae Seoul National University Understanding the cerebellar computation from statistical learning perspective
    Taegon Kim Korea Institute of Science and Technology Dependence of functional diversification by modulatory neurotransmitters on the architecture of neural networks
D-DAY